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First Baptist Church

Tower repair in progress at the First Baptist Church in Rome. The Rome Community Foundation awarded a Stevens Kingsley grant in 2013 for these and other repairs. Originally built in 1872, the historic structure was attended by Pledge of Allegiance author Francis Bellamy, who was raised in Rome and is buried in the Rome Cemetery.

 

Rome Community Foundation approves $170K in grants to local organizations

The Rome Community Foundation has awarded $170,130 in grant money to area non-profit and charitable organizations, foundation president David C. Grow announced today.

The funding, which was approved in Sept. and Dec. 2014 by the foundation's board of directors, is one of the largest allocations made by the foundation since its inception in 1999. Board members meet four times a year to review requests made by community groups for projects that benefit Rome-area residents.

Grants totaling $138,380 were derived from the foundation's Stevens-Kingsley Fund, while $28,600 was approved from the General Endowment Fund. The foundation also released another $3,150 from various donor-advised funds.

Grow said that financial contributions made to the foundation by individuals are routinely placed into a General Endowment Fund for investment purposes, the income from which is earmarked for specific grant requests from local organizations. Each grant is subject to approval by the board of directors.

He said donors can request that their contributions be given to a specific organization or for a specific purpose, such as educational, cultural, recreational, or health-related.

Grow thanked area residents for making contributions in 2014 to the Rome Community Foundation, saying he hopes individuals will continue to offer financial support when possible. "There is no question that all donations, whether large or small, make a big difference," he added.

He also praised the foundation's board of directors for their time and dedication in attending meetings, reviewing project applications, and approving grant monies. Noting that directors serve in a volunteer capacity, Grow said they provide an "invaluable public service with the best interests of the community in mind."

Through its grant program, the Rome Community Foundation is committed to supporting local organizations that offer programs and services to Rome-area residents. Additionally, the foundation ensures that donations made by individuals are professionally managed and administered, and that monies are directed to worthy projects and services in the community.

Sporting Their New Hockey Shirts
Front row from left: PeeWee players Jack Sestito and Derek Millington; and Squirt players Connor Sprock and Nino Bevilacqua. Pictured in the back row are, from left: Bob Denton, coach and board scheduler/grant writer; and Marcus Smith, coach and board secretary.

 

New Hockey Jerseys for Kids

The Rome Youth Hockey Association is purchasing new team jerseys for the more than 200 players who participate in the Rome Grizzlies youth ice hockey program, made possible in part from financial assistance provided by the Rome Community Foundation, as well as from an anonymous donor whose gift was given in honor of the Bartell Family for its longstanding tradition of supporting youth hockey in Rome.

The Rome Grizzlies program is designed to support the skating and development skills of youth between the ages of four and 18 years who are involved in the sport of ice hockey. The Rome Grizzlies practice and play their home games at the Kennedy Arena in Rome.

The Rome Community Foundation approved a grant of $12,000 last December for the purchase of the jerseys, while the anonymous donor provided significant additional funding. With the remaining money for this initial purchase that was raised by the hockey association, jerseys for players between four and 12 years of age already have been obtained; next year hockey shirts will be purchased for players between 13 and 18 years of age.

The mission of the Rome Youth Hockey Association is to provide young people with the opportunity to learn and enjoy the sport of ice hockey, as well as to help players improve their skills through effective practice sessions and competitive games.

COMMUNITY SUPPORT FOR POP WARNER — With financial assistance from the Rome Community Foundation, the Bobby Page Foundation, and individual members of the community, a new scoreboard was installed for use by the Rome Colts Pop Warner Football Organization. Shown are team players posing in front of the scoreboard at the end of last season's bowl game, along with the "Rome Bowl" trophy from the Rome Sports Hall of Fame.

 

Rome Colts Pop Warner Football

As the Rome Colts Pop Warner Football Organization prepares for its 2014 fall season, group president Michael K. East and the Rome Colts Board of Directors are thanking the Rome community for its financial support to purchase a new scoreboard, with a special nod to the Rome Community Foundation and the Bobby Page Foundation.

According to East, the Rome Colts last year received a $4,500 grant from the Rome Community Foundation's Stevens-Kingsley Fund, as well as a $1,000 donation from the Bobby Page Foundation, to help cover the $9,000 cost to purchase and install a new scoreboard at the Kevin M. Simons Pop Warner Football Complex on Bell Road.

He said the Rome Colts staff raised an additional $2,000 for the new scoreboard, while the balance was covered through fundraising activities of the Rome Colts membership. The old scoreboard displayed an illegible score and was beyond repair, he added.

"We are grateful to the Rome Community Foundation, the Bobby Page Foundation, and all the local residents for their active support in helping to finance this project," East noted. "Without their help, we would not have been able to purchase a modern, efficient scoreboard to serve the needs of players and fans."

In preparation for the Rome Colts fall football season, East said a meeting for parents was held July 21 and equipment was handed out July 22-24 for both football and cheerleading participants. Practice sessions will start Aug. 1, while the season's games begin Aug. 31 during the Labor Day weekend.

East said this is the second year that the community, through Facebook and the Colts web site, voted on several proposed slogans for the upcoming season's tee shirts. The winning slogan — "Go hard, or go home!" — will appear on the back of Colts tee shirts that will be available for sale at the July 21 parent meeting and throughout the 2014 football season.

The Pop Warner football organization serves between 180 and 200 area youth ranging in age from five to 13. The organization's mission is to teach young participants the ideals of good sportsmanship, loyalty, and honesty, which eventually help them to become responsible adults.

For further information, visit www.RomeColts.org.

 

Robert H. Olney

Robert H. Olney, a charter member of The Rome Community Foundation, passed away on Sunday, April 27, 2014 after a short illness. In 1999, he, along with other persons who believe in Rome and its future, committed to the formation of a foundation which would accept donations from the public and offer money grants to charitable organizations in Rome and towns that touch the boundaries of Rome. Over the years, Bob was an active participant in Foundation activities, working with organizations like the Rome Art and Community Center, Rescue Mission of Rome, Salvation Army and many churches in the review of grant requests received by the Foundation. For a number of years he chaired the Publicity Committee of the Foundation so that the citizens of Rome would be able to share in the positive efforts of the many charitable organizations serving Rome that were assisted by the Foundation.

In addition to Foundation activities, Bob was a director and trustee of the Rome Art and Community Center from its inception, an active participant in the leadership of Zion Episcopal Church, an active skier, golfer, boater and traveler searching out distant parts of the world and sharing those adventures with others. He set the bar high for others to follow his example, giving his time, talents and resources for the betterment of his city, his faith and his family.

The Directors of The Rome Community Foundation share the loss felt by his family and friends, but know that he gave a full lifetime helping others, with caring and tireless humility and passion for the work God gave him to do.

—David C. Grow, President

 

The Rome Community Foundation awards $116,000 in grants to local organzations

More than $116,000 has been approved for grants to area non-profit and charitable organizations by the Rome Community Foundation, foundation president David C. Grow announced on January 20, 2014.

The funding, which was approved last month by the foundation's board of directors, is the largest allocation made by the foundation during the 2013 calendar year. Board members meet four times a year to review requests made by community groups for projects that benefit Rome-area residents.

The $116,365 in grant money allocated in December was derived from the foundation's Stevens-Kingsley Fund and the General Endowment Fund. The foundation also released another $100 from the Fred Normand Fund in accordance with the donor's wishes.

Grow said that financial contributions made to the foundation by individuals are routinely placed into a general endowment fund for investment purposes, the income from which is earmarked for specific grant requests from local organizations. Each grant is subject to approval by the board of directors.

He said donors can request that their contributions be given to a specific organization or for a specific purpose, such as educational, cultural, recreational, or health-related.

Grow thanked area residents for making contributions in 2013 to the Rome Community Foundation, saying he hopes individuals will continue to offer financial support when possible. "There is no question that all donations, whether large or small, make a big difference," he added.

He also praised the foundation's 25-member board of directors for their time and dedication in attending meetings, reviewing project applications, and approving grant monies. Noting that directors serve in a volunteer capacity, Grow said they provide an "invaluable public service with the best interests of the community in mind."

Through its grant program, the Rome Community Foundation is committed to supporting local organizations that offer programs and services to Rome-area residents. Additionally, the foundation ensures that donations made by individuals are professionally managed and administered, and that monies are directed to worthy projects and services in the community.

A BRIGHTER HOLIDAY — Checking out one of the snowflake decorations that will adorn downtown street poles this holiday season are, from left: William K. Guglielmo, president of the Rome Area Chamber of Commerce and a member of the board of directors of the Rome Community Foundation; Mindy Silipo, chairperson of the Rome for the Holidays Committee; James R. Guy, maintenance foreman at the Rome City Department of Parks and Recreation; Theresa Gualtieri, member of Rome Clean and Green and the Rome for the Holidays Committee; John McMahon, vice-president of Rome Clean and Green; and Rome Mayor Joseph R. Fusco, Jr.

 

Rome for the Holidays

A $4,600 grant from the Rome Community Foundation to the Rome for the Holidays Committee will help brighten the upcoming holiday season, according to David C. Grow, foundation president.

Grow said the grant money will help the Rome for the Holidays Committee refurbish the holiday lights on 100 decorations — including shooting stars, snowflakes, and wreaths — that will adorn power poles in the downtown Rome area. He said the donation will be earmarked for the cleaning of decorations, as well as for the replacement of existing bulbs with energy-efficient LED lights.

Mindy Silipo, chairperson of the Rome for the Holidays Committee, said the grant will enable volunteers to move forward with the refurbishment project in time for the 2013 holiday period. "We are grateful to the Rome Community Foundation's board of directors for their financial support, which will enhance the aesthetics of Rome's business district," she said.

Silipo explained that exposure to the winter elements has led to broken light bulbs, rust, and severe chipping on the decorations. As a result, they have not been on display for the past three holiday seasons, she said.

Under the auspices of the Rome Clean and Green non-profit organization, the Rome for the Holidays Committee is comprised of volunteers working to raise funds to restore and enhance the holiday street pole decorations that line city streets.

In addition to the foundation's financial support, other sources of volunteer help include the city of Rome, which is donating labor costs associated with the rehabilitation and installation of holiday lights; the Rome Area Chamber of Commerce; the Underground Café, a group of teenage students who perform community service; and the Kids Oneida Program, a private youth organization that partners with Oneida County to provide volunteer assistance.

Rome Mayor Joseph R. Fusco, Jr., noted, "Local residents will once again be able to enjoy the many festive decorations that will light up the downtown district this holiday season."

He added he is pleased the city is able to underwrite the cost of lighting the decorations, an expense he says will be significantly reduced as a result of switching the outdated bulbs to LED lights. He also praised employees of the city's Department of Parks and Recreation for their "hard work and efforts" in maintaining and installing the decorations.

Fusco noted that individuals interested in volunteering their time to help refurbish the decorations can contact his office for further details.

The Rome for the Holidays Committee is seeking approximately $1,500 more in donations in order to successfully refurbish all of the street pole decorations for the 2013 holiday season.

Anyone interested in contributing to the decoration refurbishment project can make a check payable to Rome for the Holidays, c/o Rome Clean and Green, 415 N. Madison St., Rome, NY 13440. If interested in earmarking your donation for the former Trinkaus Manor holiday decorations that are displayed in the city's parks on N. James St., you can note it on your check.

The Rome Community Foundation provides financial assistance to non-profit organizations and institutions for specific projects that benefit the Rome area. Organizations with capital improvement needs may be eligible for financial support from the Foundation. To learn more or to download a grant application, visit How to Apply to the Rome Community Foundation.

 

Rome Community Theater

The Rome Community Foundation at a recent meeting approved a grant to the Rome Community Theater for $3447 to maintain and improve their parking lot. The Foundation is pleased to be able to help the theater with the repair, sealing, and striping of their parking lot.

The Rome Community Theater, located just north of Rome at 8911 Turin Road, is celebrating their 60th year of operation. The theater just finished their production of the musical "Annie" and is currently working on their two next new productions, "A Little Murder Never Hurt Any Body" to be presented in December, and "Harvey" in early February.

Grants like this from the Foundation are made possible through the income earned in its General Fund which consists of money given by individual donations, memorial contributions, and bequests from estates and other sources.

Shown inspecting the new chair lift at the Sgt. Michael A. Uvanni Municipal Pool are, from left: Foundation board member Frank P. Di Berardino III; Brandon M. Lovett, Director of Rome's Department of Administrative Services; Foundation board member Lynn Rosen; and Rome Mayor Joseph R. Fusco, Jr.

 

City of Rome

The City of Rome received a grant of $8,500 from the Stevens-Kingsley Fund that is being earmarked for the purchase of handicapped-accessible pool lifts for public swimming pools at Pinti Field, Steven's Field, and Gryziec Field. The lifts, which are being purchased locally, allow handicapped children to enter and exit the water without assistance.

Brandon M. Lovett, Director of Rome's Department of Administrative Services, said the city is required to install a lift mechanism in each of its pools to conform to provisions of the federal Americans with Disabilities Act. He noted that each year thousands of residents in the Rome area take advantage of the facilities and programs sponsored by the city's Department of Parks, Recreation, and Community Activities.

 

July 2013 Awards Announced

The Rome Community Foundation approved more than $12,000 in grant money to various area organizations at its recent quarterly meeting, Foundation President David C. Grow announced today.

The awards were made by the board of directors from several different funds maintained by the foundation, Grow noted, including the General Endowment Fund, the Restricted Fund for the Betterment of Deaf Persons, the Dyett Grant Fund, and the the Fred Normand Donor-Advised Fund. He said grants help support capital improvement projects and provide many types of equipment, materials, and supplies for local organizations. For more information, visit the Grants to Date page.

 

Hospice and Palliative Care, Inc.

Hospice and Palliative Care, Inc., of New Hartford was awarded $8,000 from the Stevens-Kingsley Fund for initial licensing fees for Smartphone Homecare software. The new software system will allow staff to provide a more thorough assessment of patient care and more accurately track employee mileage. The software is expected to save Hospice thousands of dollars each year.

According to Chief Operating Officer Joanne A. Moskal, Hospice is a charitable organization that provides compassionate end-of-life care to terminally ill individuals. She said Hospice last year served 732 patients and their families from Oneida, Herkimer, and eastern Madison counties, of which 22 percent were from the greater Rome area.

 

Rome Colts Pop Warner

The Rome Colts Pop Warner football organization was awarded $4,500 from the Stevens-Kingsley Fund to help pay for the purchase and installation of a new scoreboard at the Kevin M. Simons Pop Warner Football Complex on Bell Road. The scoreboard, which already has been installed, will be operational when the football season begins in September.

Michael K. East, President of Rome Colts Pop Warner, said the football organization serves between 180 and 200 area youth ranging in age from five to 13. He added that the program teaches young participants the ideals of good sportsmanship, loyalty, and honesty, which eventually help them to become responsible adults.

 

Foundation Officers Confer

Julie Grow Denton, secretary of the Rome Community Foundation, and David C. Grow, president, announce the awarding of more than $130,000 to local organizations for projects that benefit the Rome community. The officers noted that contributions to the Rome Community Foundation - including one-time donations from individuals - make a significant difference in the area's quality of life.

 

"Small Donations Make a Big Difference"

More than $130,000 has been approved for grants to area non-profit and charitable organizations by the Rome Community Foundation, foundation president David C. Grow announced today.

The funding, which was approved last month by the foundation's board of directors, represents one of the largest allocations ever made since the foundation was created in 1999. Board members meet four times a year to review requests made by community groups for projects that benefit Rome-area residents.

The $130,657 in grant money allocated in December was derived from the foundation's Stevens-Kingsley Fund and the General Endowment Fund. The foundation also released another $2,200 from the Elizabeth McKinstry Fund in accordance with the donor's wishes.

"Modest donations from individuals to the Rome Community Foundation definitely improve our ability to provide financial assistance to as many local organizations as possible," Grow noted. "Although we have endowment and donor-assisted funds from which we allocate grant monies, we also rely on one-time memorial donations, contributions made in honor of family or friends, and individual bequests."

David Engelbert, vice president of the Rome Community Foundation, explained that financial contributions made to the foundation by individuals are routinely placed into a general endowment fund for investment purposes, the income from which is earmarked for specific grant requests from local organizations. Each grant is subject to approval by the board of directors.

He said donors can request that their contributions be earmarked for a specific organization or for a specific purpose, such as educational, cultural, recreational, or health-related.

"The more individual donations we receive from the general public, the better we are able to serve the needs of our area's service and charitable organizations, which in turn benefits the entire community," Engelbert noted.

Grow thanked area residents for their donations to the Rome Community Foundation, saying he hopes individuals will continue to offer financial support when possible. "There is no question that small donations make a big difference," he said.

He also praised the foundation's 25-member board of directors for their time and dedication in attending meetings, reviewing project applications, and approving grant monies. Noting that directors serve in a volunteer capacity, Grow said they provide an "invaluable public service with the best interests of the community in mind."

Through its grant program, the Rome Community Foundation is committed to supporting local organizations that offer programs and services to Rome-area residents. Additionally, the foundation ensures that donations made by individuals are professionally managed and administered, and that monies are directed to worthy projects and services in the community.

 

St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church in Lee Center

The Rome Community Foundation has made a $4200 grant to St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church in Lee Center to construct a new storage building on its property. The church is a host of the Food Bank of Central New York which serves the local area. To provide fresh produce to food bank patrons, the church maintains a large vegetable garden. The new building will store gardening equipment and items necessary for the Food Bank garden. The space will also have room for lawn equipment, a snow blower, storage of seasonal decorations, and space to care for equipment. The building replaces two deteriorating structures that are beyond repair.

Volunteers have built the new 20 foot by 20 foot storage building. Dennis Gardner was the designer. Helping him build the structure were Paul Mullin, Darwin Piersall, Richard Lemieux, Ken Metz, Peter LaMonica, and Ken Puchalski. Maintenance of the church grounds and taking care of the vegetable garden are also done by volunteers.

The grant was made possible from income generated in the General Fund of the Rome Community Foundation which is the only public foundation exclusively serving the needs of persons in the Rome area. For further information about the Foundation, write to P.O. Box 609, Rome, NY 13442-0609.

 

The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army has received a $1,500 grant from the Rome Community Foundation for renovation work at its Rome Citadel Corps building on W. Dominick St.

The funding will be used for renovations to the main floor classroom, including floor tile repair, replacement of wall panels and trim, installation of a chair rail and base cove molding, and installation of a new kitchenette faucet.

According to the Salvation Army, labor on the project will be performed by staff and volunteers.

 

Rome Home

The Rome Community Foundation has given two grants to the Rome Home. One for $799 is from the Foundation's general endowment fund to assist in the work on the front porch railings and iron work. The second grant for $500 is not restricted and is from the Fred Normand Donor Advised Fund.

The Rome Home is located at 417 N. Washington St. and has been in that location since 1916. Its goal is to provide a dignified, safe and pleasant surrounding for older persons. Originally for women, men are now welcomed as residents. The home has individual rooms for 19 residents and provides meals, personal care, housekeeping, limited health care, and a variety of recreational activities.

 

The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army has received a $1,000 grant from the Rome Community Foundation for renovation and repair work at its Rome Citadel Corps building on W. Dominick St.

The funding will be used to replace ceiling tiles and repair ceramic tiles in two main-level toilet rooms. The rooms also will be painted and electric fans replaced. According to the Salvation Army, labor on the project will be performed by staff and volunteers.

 

 

MVCC and Rome partners launch Rome Futures Academy

Leaders of the City of Rome, the Rome Community Foundation, Rome City School District, and Mohawk Valley Community College today announced the launch of the new Rome Futures Academy summer program, an initiative to help incoming ninth-graders prepare for success in Rome schools on their way to college readiness.

The Rome Futures Academy is free for participating students, whose skills may have been sufficient to pass middle school but will not meet the requirements of high school, and will give priority to serving students from low-income families. Participating students will attend a four-week summer camp in the mornings, Mondays -Thursdays, July 16 - Aug. 9, at MVCC's Rome campus. Students can choose from two career tracks, health care or information technology, with a special focus on career development and literacy. The hands-on program features fun projects, activities, and field trips that will help students explore their chosen career track.

In making the announcement, Grow praised Bartell for his effective community leadership, noting he is a valuable addition to the foundation's board. "Doug's impressive record of community service demonstrates how committed he is to enhancing the quality of life for our citizens, which is precisely the goal of the Rome Community Foundation."

"The partnerships that support this program will provide students with a meaningful experience that makes learning relevant and fun by showcasing career opportunities here in the Mohawk Valley," says Randall J. VanWagoner, Ph.D., president of Mohawk Valley Community College.

The Rome Futures Academy is designed to help participating students build self-esteem and self-confidence; improve reading, writing, and communications skills; develop problem-solving and critical thinking abilities; enhance their computer learning; find out about jobs and learn more about specific career paths; understand the link between school and future employment; learn more about education, training, employment, and life choices; and work as a team with peers and share responsibilities. Transportation is provided. Students should check with their guidance counselors to see if they are eligible.

The project builds upon Rome's long-standing connections with MVCC as the college's top dual credit partner and the school district that produces more MVCC Presidential Scholars than any other school district in Oneida County.

"The MVCC Rome Futures Academy is a shining example of how schools and community colleges can partner to ensure high school students graduate ready for college or careers," says Rome City School District Superintendent Jeffrey P. Simons.

"The Rome Futures Academy is another outstanding program geared toward providing students with some academic help in literacy, goal-setting, and emergent thinking regarding possible future careers in health care and information technology," says Richard E. Quest, Ed.D, dean of MVCC's Rome campus. "Providing students with an opportunity to explore careers that are available, lucrative, and local is the foundation of creating a knowledgeable, contributing citizenry that fits with the mission and vision of Mohawk Valley Community College and its educational and business community partners."

The Academy is an alliance among MVCC, the Rome schools and other partners. It is made possible by a significant grant from the Rome Community Foundation. The investment in Rome-area students is part of MVCC's $7 million Challenge and Opportunity major gifts campaign.

"The Rome Community Foundation is very pleased to provide financial support for the implementation of MVCC's Rome Futures Academy," says David C. Grow, president of the Rome Community Foundation. "We applaud Mohawk Valley Community College for developing this innovative plan, which not only seeks to address the literacy needs of Rome area youth, but also will help them develop career interests, particularly in the fields of healthcare and information technology."

For more information about the Rome Futures Academy or to register, contact MVCC at 315-792-5300 or visit Rome Futures Academy.

NEW BOARD MEMBER - Douglas W. Bartell, left, reviews grant applications with David C. Grow, president of the Rome Community Foundation, during a recent meeting of the board of directors at the downtown office of the Rome Area Chamber of Commerce. Bartell, who is the board's newest member, said he looks forward to working with the Rome-based public foundation, which provides funding for worthwhile community projects.

 

Bartell to serve on the board of directors of the Rome Community Foundation

Douglas W. Bartell, vice president of the Oneida Savings Bank, has been elected to serve on the board of directors of the Rome Community Foundation, foundation president David C. Grow today announced.

Bartell joins 24 other board members who meet periodically to review requests for financial assistance from charitable and non-profit organizations that seek funding for specific projects to benefit the Rome area.

In making the announcement, Grow praised Bartell for his effective community leadership, noting he is a valuable addition to the foundation's board. "Doug's impressive record of community service demonstrates how committed he is to enhancing the quality of life for our citizens, which is precisely the goal of the Rome Community Foundation."

Bartell currently serves as chairman of the Griffiss Utility Service Corporation, treasurer of the Griffiss Park Landowners Association, and a board member of the Griffiss Local Development Corporation.

Additionally, he is president of the Jervis Public Library, a trustee of the Herbert T. Dyett Foundation, a board member of the Teugega Country Club, and an active member of the Rome Community Theater and the Lake Delta Yacht Club.

He previously served as board chairman of the Rome Area Chamber of Commerce and as a vice president of Mohawk Valley EDGE.

"I look forward to serving on the board of directors of the Rome Community Foundation, which has played such an important role in providing financial help to many of Rome's service organizations since its creation in 1999," Bartell said.

Among the institutions and organizations that have received financial assistance from the Rome Community Foundation are the Rome Art and Community Center, Humane Society of Rome, Capitol Theatre, Hospice and Palliative Care, Inc., Jervis Public Library, Rome Sports Hall of Fame, Rome Cemetery Association, Rome Historical Society, Habitat for Humanity, Rome Baseball Association, United Cerebral Palsy, and Rome Main Street Alliance.

KEEPING SCORE - A new scoreboard stands ready for use when the Rome Baseball Association begins hosting baseball games later this summer at its new Legacy Field, located near the Chestnut Street entrance to Griffiss Business and Technology Park. In the background is the B-52 stratofortress airplane "Mohawk Valley" that greets visitors to the tech park entrance. The scoreboard is made possible through a grant from the Rome Community Foundation's Stevens-Kingsley Fund.

 

Rome Baseball Association Hits Home Run with New Scoreboard

Thanks to an $8,000 grant from the Rome Community Foundation, a new scoreboard has been erected on Legacy Field, the Rome Baseball Association's fourth baseball diamond that is expected to be operational later this summer.

Jeff DeLutis, chairman of the Rome Baseball Association, said the newly constructed field will enable the non-profit organization to serve more youth in the target age group of 13-18 years old. He said the installation of the scoreboard is part of an overall major construction plan that included land preparation, new field fencing, dugouts, a press box, a warning track, and eventual spectator seating.

The new diamond is located on a 20.5-acre parcel of land near the Chestnut Street entrance to Griffiss Business and Technology Park.

"We are very grateful for the continuing support of the Rome Community Foundation, whose financial help enables us to maintain a reputation as one of the top baseball facilities in New York state," DeLutis noted.

DeLutis estimates that Legacy Field will be able to add as many as 50 games to the association's roster each year, as well as host significantly more out-of-state teams from such places as New Jersey, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Canada. He said the new field also will be used for team practice sessions on days when games are not scheduled.

David C. Grow, president of the Rome Community Foundation, said the grant from the foundation's Stevens-Kingsley Fund recognizes the baseball association for its dedication and commitment to residents of the Rome area.

"The Rome Baseball Association provides a very valuable service to our community by offering high-quality baseball facilities that are enjoyed by youth and adult teams alike," Grow said.

Anyone interested in checking the 2012 schedule of games of the Rome Baseball Association, or in obtaining more information, can visit its web site at www.delutisfield.org

The Rome Community Foundation provides financial assistance to non-profit organizations and institutions for specific projects that benefit the Rome community. It also accepts individual donations, memorial contributions, and bequests from a variety of sources. To learn more about the foundation, visit www.RomeCommunityFoundation.org.

photo of Brown & Grow

Natalie Brown & Dave Grow

 

YWCA's Lucy's House

Lucy's House, the YWCA Mohawk Valley's Rome area domestic violence safe dwelling, recently received funding assistance from the Rome Community Foundation. The $6,591 grant will provide Lucy's House with a new heating and central air unit, which will greatly increase energy efficiency and reduce facility gas and electric costs.

"We want to express our deep gratitude to the Rome Community Foundation for their support," said YWCA Mohawk Valley Executive Director Natalie Brown. "This funding directly impacts women and children in western Oneida County who are victims of domestic violence. With the Foundation's help, we are providing a safe, stable, comfortable environment for these individuals as they strive to heal and improve their lives. Thank you to the Foundation for continuing to help us change lives."

Lucy's House is a 6-bed residential dwelling that offers a safe haven to women and children fleeing domestic violence. Residents are allowed to stay for up to 90 days as they seek a safe living alternative and work through related issues. The program is licensed by and adheres to New York State Office of Children and Family Services standards. It is the only domestic violence facility in the Rome area and is one of two operated by the YWCA in Oneida County. Since opening in 2001, Lucy's House has served more than 500 individuals.

In Oneida County, domestic violence, like all communities, is a serious problem. Locally in 2011, Rome City Police responded to 1,651 domestic incidents, 276 Family Offense Orders of Protection were processed in Rome Family Court, and Oneida County Child Protective Services received 4,437 domestic violence-related child abuse reports, 1,560 of which were in Rome. The YWCA provided 133 individuals with domestic violence residential services and the agency's transitional housing program for homeless victims of domestic violence provided services to 54 individuals. The YWCA's 24-hour hotline answered 1,594 domestic violence-related calls.

In addition to its domestic violence crisis services in Oneida County, the YWCA also provides sexual violence crisis services in Oneida and Herkimer counties. Those services include a 24-hour confidential hotline, victim advocacy and accompaniment throughout all medical and legal procedures, individual and group counseling, information and support, and referrals to outside services.

If you or someone you know is in need of assistance, call the YWCA's hotlines: 797-7740 in Oneida County or 866-4120 in Herkimer County.

 

The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army on West Dominick Street received two grants totaling $8,204 from the Rome Community Foundation. The Stevens Kingsley Fund, part of the Rome Community Foundation, gave a grant of $5100 for a new freezer and refrigerator, paint and tile repair. A second grant from the Foundation's general fund was for $3104 to purchase folding tables, stackable chairs, and a table caddy. The new tables and chairs replace the old furniture from the former Camp Alice Newton

 

First United Methodist Church, the Jervis Library, and the Rome Family Y

The Foundation also made its 6th annual distribution from its Elizabeth McKinstry Designated Fund to the First United Methodist Church, the Jervis Library, and the Rome Family Y. The Fund's income for 2011 was $2150. Under the Fund's agreement, half or $1075 went to the church, three-eighths or $806.25 went to the library, and one-eighth or $268.75 went to the Rome Family Y. The money in each case may be used at the discretion of the organizations' boards.

Elizabeth McKinstry died in 2005. Yet by establishing a designated fund with the Rome Community Foundation her favorite charities continue to receive annual distributions in her memory, and will in the years to come.

 

Capitol Civic Center

A grant of $2500 was made to the Capitol Civic Center from the Foundation's Fred Normand Donor Advised Fund. The unrestricted grant to the Rome theater was made possible from the income earned by this fund in 2011. With a donor advised fund income is paid to charitable organizations recommended to the Foundation by the donor.

 

The First Baptist Church

The First Baptist Church, located at 301 W. Embargo St., will earmark funds for emergency repairs as well as for longer-term interior and exterior repair work. Originally built in 1872, the historic structure was attended by Pledge of Allegiance author Francis Bellamy, who was raised in Rome and is buried in the Rome Cemetery.

 

The Grace Union American Methodist Episcopal Church

The Grace Union American Methodist Episcopal Church, which is the oldest African-American Church in Rome, will use its grant money for basement and decking repairs. The church, which regularly hosts a variety of community functions that include senior citizen lunches and dinners, is located at 606 Woodland Ave.

 

St. John the Baptist Church

St. John the Baptist Church at 210 E. Dominick St. will target its funding for brick repairs to the building and for the installation of new roofing over the rectory and garage. One of the largest Roman Catholic churches in the community, St. John's parish has been a landmark at its current location for more than 50 years.

photo of Linderman & McCarthy

The new changing area, pictured from the left, Robert Olney and Fred Normand, Directors of the Rome Community Foundation, Bruce Hairston, Branch Director of the Rome YMCA, Kim Thornton and Evelyn Surace, Y members who had just used the new changing area.

 

Rome Family YMCA

The Stevens Kingsley Fund of the Rome Community Foundation has made a grant of $13,100 to the Rome Family YMCA. The YMCA purchased eight laptop computers for use by the staff with $5,600 of the grant. The remaining $7,500 was used to convert the boy's changing room into a family changing room. The room was partitioned off to add three individual changing rooms with private curtains. The shower area was also partitioned off to add three private shower rooms, along with an additional private bathroom. The entire floor was redone with a rougher slip proof surface to prevent slipping. Currently the rooms are in active use.

This grant was from the Stevens Kingsley Fund, which now is now a most important part of the Rome Community Foundation.

photo of Linderman & McCarthy

Two-year-old Eden McCarthy listens intently as Linnea P. Linderman, M.D., right, reads her a children's book during a checkup at Rome Pediatric and Adolescent Medical Associates. Looking on are Eden's parents, Rich and Julie McCarthy of Rome, and brother Finn, four months. As a volunteer with the Reach Out and Read program, Dr. Linderman encourages parents to read to their young children on a daily basis, noting that the activity creates a strong basis for later learning and ultimate success in school.

 

Reach Out and Read

A literacy program that encourages parents to read to their young children and helps prepare toddlers for school is receiving financial assistance from the Rome Community Foundation for the purchase of books.

Reach Out and Read, a national non-profit organization that promotes early literacy and school readiness, works with pediatric primary care providers to prescribe books and encourage families to read together. The early-reading effort extends to all 50 states, including areas with moderate- to lower-income households.

Locally, the program is partnered with Rome Pediatric and Adolescent Medical Associates, whose doctors and other medical staff confer with children and their parents at each well-child medical checkup about the importance of reading at an early age.

The Rome Community Foundation grant will allow doctors from the Rome practice to continue distributing a free age-appropriate book to every child, regardless of family income level, beginning with the six-month checkup and continuing through age five.

Linnea P. Linderman, M.D., a pediatrician with Rome Pediatric and Adolescent Medical Associates, said the Reach Out and Read program builds upon the special relationship between doctors and the parents of young children. She noted that physicians are often the only source of trusted professional advice that parents receive in the first five years of their children's lives — long before they come in contact with the education system.

"Studies have shown that parents who receive books for their children and literacy counseling from their doctors are more likely to read to their young children on a regular basis," Dr. Linderman noted. "In addition, children served by Reach Out and Read enter kindergarten with a six-month developmental edge, and have larger vocabularies and stronger language skills."

Rome Pediatric and Adolescent Medical Associates joined the Reach Out and Read program in 2006, serving more than 1,300 children between the ages of six months and five years. Nationwide, Reach Out and Read's volunteer doctors and nurse practitioners will have provided over six million new books to nearly four million children at healthcare locations throughout the country by the end of 2011.

For further information about Reach Out and Read and its literacy efforts, visit the program's web site at www.reachoutandread.org.

photo of DeLutis and players

Players pose with Rome Baseball Association Chairman Jeff DeLutis prior to a Little League game at Freedom Field. Pictured, from left, are: Branden East, age 9; Marc D'Arcangelo, 9; Jake Podkowka, 9; and Evan DeLutis, 7. With financial help from the Rome Community Foundation, a sprinkler system has been installed to enhance the field's quality and make it safer for players.

 

The Rome Baseball Association

The Rome Baseball Association has completed installation of a sprinkler system for its Little League baseball field, thanks in large measure to a $5,000 grant from the Rome Community Foundation's Stevens-Kingsley Fund.

Jeff DeLutis, chairman of the non-profit baseball association, said the grant money, combined with private donations, enabled the association to complete the project ahead of schedule. He said the new system will make it easier for the association to maintain a healthy grass playing area, and will enable it to water the infield dirt surface prior to and in between games.

The Little League field — known as "Freedom Field" — is one of three baseball diamonds operated by the association. The fields are located on a 20.5-acre parcel of land near the Chestnut St. entrance to Griffiss Business and Technology Park.

"Ever since the Rome Baseball Association was established in 1997, our mission has been to offer high-quality baseball facilities that can be enjoyed by youth and adult league teams alike," DeLutis said. "Today, we are proud of our three premiere fields that continually serve thousands of players young and old, loyal fans, and the community-at-large."

"We are especially grateful to the Rome Community Foundation and to our individual supporters whose financial help makes possible the new sprinkler system for Freedom Field," he added.

According to DeLutis, without the sprinkler system, the infield and outfield grass and dirt playing surfaces would become scorched and rough, especially during hot summer days.

"The new automatic sprinklers at Freedom Field will enhance the quality of the field and make it easier and safer for players to play on," he noted.

He said the Rome Baseball Association oversees hundreds of games each season played by local Little Leagues, high school teams, Babe Ruth teams, and collegiate-level teams. It also has hosted district and regional Little League tournaments, and has been the site of the American Legion county and state district finals.

"The impressive quality of our fields has earned us a reputation as one of the top baseball facilities in the state," DeLutis said. "I invite community residents to attend our games, cheer the players, and have an enjoyable time participating in one of America's favorite pastimes."

Anyone interested in obtaining further information about the Rome Baseball Association can visit its web site at www.delutisfield.org.

photo of Seifert and pickup truck

Rick Seifert, superintendent of the Rome Cemetery, stands beside the newly purchased pickup truck used for grounds maintenance, thanks to financial help from four Rome foundations. In the background is the Gothic revival-inspired Kingsley Memorial Chapel. The Rome Cemetery, established in the mid-1800s as the resting-place for many prominent Romans, is a treasure trove of local history.

 

The Rome Cemetery

The Rome Cemetery — one of the city's historic and cultural treasures — has gotten a bit of financial help from several area organizations to help preserve the sprawling 140-acre site located on Jervis Ave. in the northwest section of Rome.

The Rome Cemetery Association, which oversees operation of the non-profit cemetery, received sufficient funding to purchase a new one-ton pickup truck that is vital to the upkeep of the property, including grounds maintenance, burial preparation, and snow removal.

The Rome Community Foundation; the Hazen B. Hinman, Sr., Foundation; the Rome Savings Bank Foundation; and the Sears Family Foundation of Rome, New York, awarded grant monies to enable the cemetery association to replace its 22-year-old truck, long in need of repairs that were too costly to make.

Rome Cemetery Association President R. Joseph Jalbert said the funding came at a critical time for the cemetery. "We are extremely grateful for the generous financial assistance offered by these community groups," he noted. "Their contributions mean we will be better equipped to maintain the grounds of the cemetery and preserve its rich cultural heritage."

Jalbert said the association recently purchased, and is now using, a new 2011 vehicle from Lee GMC in Boonville. He said Lee GMC allowed the association to buy the truck at cost.

According to Rome Cemetery Office Manager Malinda Abraham, local as well as out-of-area visitors regularly stroll through the cemetery to enjoy the beautiful grounds in a quiet setting and to see the variety of monuments that reflect the names of the city's earliest families.

"Visitors are especially impressed by the Kingsley Memorial Chapel, the Parker F. Scripture Memorial Carillon, and the gravesites of other famous Romans," Abraham said.

Among the noted individuals buried in the non-denominational cemetery are Jesse Williams, founder of the country's first cheese factory; Francis Bellamy, author of the Pledge of Allegiance; Medal of Honor recipients Wilson Smith and Oscar Burkard; and Henrietta Bowen, a former slave born in the state of Maryland who died a free woman in Rome in 1860.

By the mid-1800s, Rome's first burial ground — located in the area now known as Fort Stanwix Park — was inadequate for the needs of the community. Consequently, the Rome Cemetery Association was established in 1851 to find a new, larger site; two years later the Jervis Ave. location was selected.

Anyone interested in further information about the Rome Cemetery, including details on self-guided tours, can call the cemetery's office at 336-6210.

   

The Capitol Theater

The Rome Community Foundation's Stevens Kingsley Fund awarded a $15,000 grant to the Capitol Theater. This grant will help with an ambitious project to replace the theater's HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) system. A design which will utilize some of the existing air ducts and add new ducts, yet be in keeping with the historic nature of the building is underway. The new system will be far more effective and energy efficient with a considerable savings in operating costs.

   

Lake Delta Volunteer Fire Department

The Rome Community Foundation recently made a grant for $3200 from the Stevens Kingsley Fund to the Lake Delta Volunteer Fire Department. The grant is to assist in the purchase of pagers, gloves, and hoods.

The pagers will help the fire department comply with new Federal Communication Commission narrow band frequency rules. Protective gloves were needed to replace older ones. Hoods were also purchased to be worn under helmets to protect firemen from injury due to heat, fire, and trauma.

   

The Rome Home

The Rome Community Foundation has given a $2720 grant to The Rome Home to assist in the replacement of sprinkler heads and for the required elevator code inspection. The two-story brick building, at 417 North Washington Street in Rome, was built in 1868. It is an excellent example of Italianate architecture and is well worth keeping in good condition.

The Rome Home has been in this location since 1916. Their goal is to provide a dignified and pleasant surrounding for older persons. The home has individual rooms for 19 residents, and provides meals, personal care, housekeeping, limited health care, and a variety of recreational activities.

   

Distribution from its Elizabeth McKinstry Designated Fund (December 2010)

The Foundation made its fifth annual distribution from its Elizabeth McKinstry Designated Fund to the First United Methodist Church, the Jervis Public Library, and the Rome Family Y. The Fund's income to be distributed in 2010 was $2100. Under the Fund agreement one-half or $1050 went to the church, three-eights or $785.50 went to the library, and one-eight or $262.50 went to the Y. The grant money may be used at the discretion of each organization's board.

   

Capitol Civic Center

A fourth grant of $2500 was made to the Capitol Civic Center from the Community Foundation's Fred Normand Donor Advised Fund. This grant was also made possible from income earned by this particular fund in 2010.

photo of Rome Home  

Zion Episcopal Church

The Rome Community Foundation has made a special grant to Zion Episcopal Church for $5000 to assist the church in making temporary repairs to the Bell Tower. This grant is from the Foundation's Stevens-Kingsley Fund, and is being paid from income generated from investments of the fund's assets.

There has been concern in recent years that the Bell Tower has been leaning toward the church building. The structural engineering firm of Klepper, Hahn, and Hyatt in Syracuse was hired to conduct a condition assessment of the tower and determine if the lean was a concern. Fortunately, they felt that the lean was not an issue, but did find other major problems. There was water seepage in the Bell Tower, loose stonework, and the mortar between the stones throughout the church building and social hall must be repaired. The cost would be well over a half a million dollars. Money will have to be raised to do some or all of the work that is needed to preserve this architectural and historic treasure.

Since that amount of money was not available, it was recommended that temporary repairs to the Bell Tower be made before the winter. With the Rome Community Foundation grant and some church funds, the Lupini Construction Company of New York Mills, who specialize in masonry restoration, was hired. The temporary repairs involve removing the angled capstones that are unstable and putting a rubber membrane over all angled capstones in addition to the flat area under the bells proper.

photo of Rome Home  

Rome Historical Society

The Rome Community Foundation has given a grant for $4289 from its Stevens Kingsley Fund to the Rome Historical Society to purchase a new, high-speed photocopier. This new equipment will enable the society to make more professional copies of their correspondence, newsletters, and membership requests. The new copier should also save the center maintenance expense, which had been increasing on the old equipment.

The Rome Community Foundation was formed in 1999 as a public community foundation for the purpose of benefiting the citizens of Rome and the immediate area. The Foundation encourages the growth of a permanent charitable endowment, which can make strategic grants as investments in the Rome community. The Foundation also provides citizens with the means to make giving easy, effective and lasting. Gifts to the Foundation may be established in connection with a person's estate plan or as a memorial, honor or remembrance.

   

The Rome Home

The Rome Community Foundation has given a $1900 grant to The Rome Home to help repair the cupola on the roof of their building. The two-story brick building, at 417 North Washington Street in Rome, was built in 1868. It is an excellent example of Italianate architecture and is well worth keeping in good repair.

The Rome Home has been in this location since 1916. Their goal is to provide a dignified and pleasant surrounding for older ladies. The home has individual rooms for 19 residents, and provides meals, personal care, housekeeping, limited health care, and a variety of recreational activities.

This grant was made possible from the income generated in the general endowment fund, which has been created by contributions from many persons in the Rome area.

photo of Rome Home
Shown at the elevator are Bob Olney, a director of the Rome Community Foundation, Fred Niebuhr, church's building committee, Pastor Jeff Childs, Howard Simonin, church's building committee, and the architect, Paul Huysman.
 

First United Methodist Church

The Rome Community Foundation has made a $10,000 grant from its Stevens-Kingsley Fund to the First United Methodist Church to help with the purchase and installation of a new elevator. The church has been undergoing a major renovation begun about a year ago. There is a new entrance on North George Street, and the remodeling has resulted in handicapped accessibility for all areas of the church. Other improvements include new office and administrative space and a large community center for education, child care, and future youth and senior programs.

Formed in the 1960s by former Roman, Stoddard Stevens, the Stevens-Kingsley Foundation was dissolved in 2005, and its assets were transferred to the Rome Community Foundation. It is administrated as a separate fund with grants made each year in the late fall or early winter.

photo of Rome Home
Pictured clockwise from the front left are Rose Guiliano, Marie Davis, Muriel Goggin, Jennie Clapps, and Charlotte Mack.
 

Rome Home

The Stevens-Kingsley Fund of the Rome Community Foundation has given a $4000 grant to the Rome Home to replace the dining room chairs. The accompanying picture shows five of the residents seated in the new chairs.

Today the Rome Home has individual rooms for 19 ladies, and provides them with meals, personal care, housekeeping, laundry service, limited health care, and a variety of recreational activities.

The Rome Home was established in 1909 originally to provide a dignified and serene surrounding for older ladies without families. The home started in a rented house on Elm Street, and then in 1916 moved to the present location at 417 North Washington Street in the historic district. The two-story brick house was built in 1868, and is an excellent example of Italianate architecture.

 

Rome Cemetery

At a recent meeting of the Rome Community Foundation, a $2400 grant was made to the Rome Cemetery Association to help with their ongoing project of 'mapping' of the cemetery. This project engages a licensed surveyor to accurately map the cemetery, identifying each individual lot by location, size, and by name. Roads, buildings and other cemetery property will also be recorded. With this data, detailed maps will be made, which will be invaluable for maintenance and for administrative purposes. Visitors will also be able to use these maps to easily find lots that they are interested in.

This grant was made possible from the income generated in the general endowment fund, which has been created by contributions from many persons in the Rome area.

 

Rome Police & Fire Memorial

The Rome Community Foundation has made a $3000 grant from the Stevens Kingsley Fund to Rome Up and Running, Inc. With the grant the Rome Police and Fireman's Memorial project has purchased a trailer to provide secure storage for support equipment and supplies for the memorial park at the corner of Black River Boulevard and Court Street. Cleaning and maintenance equipment, water treatment chemicals, filters, water pump, landscape tools and supplies will be housed in the trailer.

 

Welcome Home

The Rome Community Foundation recently made a $4000 grant to the Welcome Hall Community Center for equipment at the Rome facility. That equipment includes metal shelving for storage needs in the kitchen area, shelving for clothing and household items at the center's donation site, an ice machine, and 14 new mattresses for their 7 new bunk beds.

For years, Welcome Hall Community Center has effectively met many of the needs of our community's less fortunate men, women, and children. The Center prepares and serves hot meals, provides food baskets, distributes personal need items to children, and household items for some families. They also provide emergency shelter and care for women and children, and transitional housing for single parent families. The success of Welcome Hall is due to their dedicated staff, many loyal volunteers, and financial support of the community.

 

McKinstry Grant — Three Rome Organizations Benefit

The Rome Community Foundation has distributed $2400 from its Elizabeth McKinstry Designated Fund to the First United Methodist Church, the Jervis Public Library, and the Rome Family Y. This special fund was established in 2006 to support these three organizations from the interest earned. Distributions will be made annually in memory of the donor.

 

RFA Knight Times Camera

The grant was from the Rome Community Foundation's Stevens-Kingsley Fund to the Rome City School District for $1200 for the purchase of a new camera. The camera is currently in use by students and should enhance the publication of the RFA Knight Times newspaper.